2016 Alysa
Senior - Clarkson University
Major: Electrical Engineering
Minor: Computer Science
Alysa Leong is a rising junior studying electrical engineering with a computer science minor at Clarkson University. Born and raised in New York City, Alysa is used to the hustle and bustle of life, which is heavily prevalent with technology.  In the future, Alysa hopes to help with cyber security issues such as preventing identity fraud. Currently, Alysa is involved in biometrics research: she is currently working on an iris recognition program that uses deep learning. 

She has interned at General Electric twice and has helped with a variety of electrical hardware tasks such as wiring fixtures, conducting circuit board tests, debugging, and soldering. Aside from research and SASE, Alysa is involved with Clarkson’s Humane Society Club, the Society of Women Engineers, Knitting for the Needy, and Clarkson’s Honors Program.

Alysa became involved with SASE a few months after the beginning of her freshman year and is eternally grateful. SASE has allowed her to develop leadership skills, personal growth, and communication skills. She was elected the vice president of Clarkson’s SASE chapter for 2016-2017, and she is excited to give back to SASE and help other members develop as leaders as well. Alysa values family and loves the family aspect of SASE.

 

Who or what inspired you to get involved in your STEM outreach activities?

One of my inspirations is my roommate from freshman year, XuLan Deng, who is also part of SASE. She was the one who introduced me to SASE and is a great role model for reaching out to others and getting people involved. Without her, I likely would not have had much interaction with SASE, so I’m thankful for her. I am going to continue with SASE and STEM outreach activities to try to “open the door” to opportunities for others as well.

What is the most valuable thing you’ve learned while being involved in the STEM field?

The most valuable thing I have learned while being involved in the STEM field is that communication is the most important thing to develop and learn how to do effectively. No matter where you go, communication is prevalent: with peers, coworkers, bosses, customers, and other people you interact with. If you can’t effectively communicate your ideas or your work, people won’t understand and won’t care as much. I think there is a saying that goes something like, “How you say it is more important than what you say,” and it’s true.  

 

We know you are a talented student; what motivates you to be a good learner and to put forth your best effort?

This may be cliché, but my parents’ support and love motivate me to put forth my best effort. Without them, I would not be where I am today, and I want to be able to give back to them and let them know I appreciate everything they have done—and continue to do—for me. I also hope to be able to provide for any children I have in the future the same way my parents have for me, and to do that I need to work hard and apply myself to everything I do.  

 

What is your most memorable experience for volunteering?

My most memorable experience for volunteering was when I volunteered for an activity fair type of thing my research lab held for a camp that was at Clarkson one summer. I helped with an activity that involved lifting fingerprints off of a television screen. It was very interesting for me in two ways: one, it was great seeing the kids engaged and enthusiastic about a STEM related activity that can be relevant in the real world; two, it felt like I was on NCIS or another crime show lifting fingerprints at a crime scene.

 

If you were on a deserted island, what is one item that you would bring and why?

If I were on a deserted island, for practicality, I would bring a knife. I would be able to get food, cut wood, and do other survival tasks to survive. However, for fun, I would bring a guitar. I have always wanted to learn how to play the guitar, and what better opportunity than when on an island? Plus I’d be able to (try to) play music so I don’t go completely stir-crazy.

She has interned at General Electric twice and has helped with a variety of electrical hardware tasks such as wiring fixtures, conducting circuit board tests, debugging, and soldering. Aside from research and SASE, Alysa is involved with Clarkson’s Humane Society Club, the Society of Women Engineers, Knitting for the Needy, and Clarkson’s Honors Program.

Alysa became involved with SASE a few months after the beginning of her freshman year and is eternally grateful. SASE has allowed her to develop leadership skills, personal growth, and communication skills. She was elected the vice president of Clarkson’s SASE chapter for 2016-2017, and she is excited to give back to SASE and help other members develop as leaders as well. Alysa values family and loves the family aspect of SASE.

 

Who or what inspired you to get involved in your STEM outreach activities?

One of my inspirations is my roommate from freshman year, XuLan Deng, who is also part of SASE. She was the one who introduced me to SASE and is a great role model for reaching out to others and getting people involved. Without her, I likely would not have had much interaction with SASE, so I’m thankful for her. I am going to continue with SASE and STEM outreach activities to try to “open the door” to opportunities for others as well.

What is the most valuable thing you’ve learned while being involved in the STEM field?

The most valuable thing I have learned while being involved in the STEM field is that communication is the most important thing to develop and learn how to do effectively. No matter where you go, communication is prevalent: with peers, coworkers, bosses, customers, and other people you interact with. If you can’t effectively communicate your ideas or your work, people won’t understand and won’t care as much. I think there is a saying that goes something like, “How you say it is more important than what you say,” and it’s true.  

 

We know you are a talented student; what motivates you to be a good learner and to put forth your best effort?

This may be cliché, but my parents’ support and love motivate me to put forth my best effort. Without them, I would not be where I am today, and I want to be able to give back to them and let them know I appreciate everything they have done—and continue to do—for me. I also hope to be able to provide for any children I have in the future the same way my parents have for me, and to do that I need to work hard and apply myself to everything I do.  

 

What is your most memorable experience for volunteering?

My most memorable experience for volunteering was when I volunteered for an activity fair type of thing my research lab held for a camp that was at Clarkson one summer. I helped with an activity that involved lifting fingerprints off of a television screen. It was very interesting for me in two ways: one, it was great seeing the kids engaged and enthusiastic about a STEM related activity that can be relevant in the real world; two, it felt like I was on NCIS or another crime show lifting fingerprints at a crime scene.

 

If you were on a deserted island, what is one item that you would bring and why?

If I were on a deserted island, for practicality, I would bring a knife. I would be able to get food, cut wood, and do other survival tasks to survive. However, for fun, I would bring a guitar. I have always wanted to learn how to play the guitar, and what better opportunity than when on an island? Plus I’d be able to (try to) play music so I don’t go completely stir-crazy.